Diabetes: A History of Race and Disease

Arleen Marcia Tuchman

Format: Hardback

Publisher: Yale University Press

Published: 04-09-2020

£25.00

Gift Wrapping – our gift wrapping option will be back soon

Have your books hand wrapped in our bespoke tissue paper with our kite sticker to tie it all together.

Description

Who gets diabetes and why? An in-depth examination of diabetes in the context of race, public health, class, and heredity Who is considered most at risk for diabetes, and why? In this thorough, engaging book, historian Arleen Tuchman examines and critiques how these questions have been answered by both the public and medical communities for over a century in the United States. Beginning in the late nineteenth century, Tuchman describes how at different times Jews, middle-class whites, American Indians, African Americans, and Hispanic Americans have been labeled most at risk for developing diabetes, and that such claims have reflected and perpetuated troubling assumptions about race, ethnicity, and class. She describes how diabetes underwent a mid-century transformation in the public’s eye from being a disease of wealth and “civilization” to one of poverty and “primitive” populations. In tracing this cultural history, Tuchman argues that shifting understandings of diabetes reveal just as much about scientific and medical beliefs as they do about the cultural, racial, and economic milieus of their time.

Additional information

Weight 0.55 kg
Dimensions 23 × 165 × 245 mm
Page Count 288